Cookie Policy

Our Privacy Policy explains our principles when it comes to the collection, processing, and storage of your information.

Our Cookie Policy explains how we, our partners, and users of our services deploy cookies, as well as the options you have to control them.

What are cookies?

Cookies are small pieces of data, stored in text files, that are stored on your computer or other device when websites are loaded in a browser. They are widely used to “remember” you and your preferences, either for a single visit (through a “session cookie”) or for multiple repeat visits (using a “persistent cookie”). They ensure a consistent and efficient experience for visitors, and perform essential functions such as allowing users to register and remain logged in. Cookies may be set by the site that you are visiting (known as “first party cookies”), or by third parties, such as those who serve content or provide advertising or analytics services on the website (“third party cookies”).

Both websites and HTML emails may also contain other tracking technologies such as “web beacons” or “pixels.” These are typically small transparent images that provide us with statistics, for similar purposes as cookies. They are often used in conjunction with cookies, though they are not stored on your computer in the same way. As a result, if you disable cookies, web beacons may still load, but their functionality will be restricted.

How cookies are used?

We use cookies for a number of different purposes. Some cookies are necessary for technical reasons; some enable a personalized experience for both visitors and registered users; and some allow the display of advertising from selected third party networks. Some of these cookies may be set when a page is loaded, or when a visitor takes a particular action (clicking the “like” or “follow” button on a post, for example).

Many of the cookies we use are only set if you are a registered WordPress.com user (so you don’t have to log in every time, for example), while others are set whenever you visit our website, irrespective of whether you have a WordPress account.

  • Functionality

These cookies are used to store preferences set by users such as account name, language, and location.

  • Security

We use these cookies to help identify and prevent potential security risks.

  • Analytics and Performance

Performance cookies collect information on how users interact with our websites, including what pages are visited most, as well as other analytical data. We use these details to improve how our websites function and to understand how users interact with them.

  • Advertising

These cookies are used to display relevant advertising to visitors, as well as to understand and report on the efficacy of ads served on our websites. They track details such as the number of unique visitors, the number of times particular ads have been displayed, and the number of clicks the ads have received. They are also used to build user profiles, including showing you ads based on products you’ve viewed or acts you have taken on our (and other) websites. These are set by Automattic and trusted third party networks, and are generally persistent in nature.

  • Third Party / Embedded Content

We use different third party applications and services to enhance the experience of website visitors. These include social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter (through the use of sharing buttons), or embedded content from Youtube and Vimeo. As a result, cookies may be set by these third parties, and used by them to track your online activity. We have no direct control over the information that is collected by these cookies.

 

JETPACK

  • Jetpack Comments
Cookie Name Purpose
comment_author_{HASH} Remembers the value entered into the comment form‘s name field. Specific to the site from which it is set. This cookie mirrors one set by the core WordPress software for commenting purposes.
comment_author_email_{HASH} Remembers the value entered into the comment form‘s email field. Specific to the site from which it is set. This cookie mirrors one set by the core WordPress software for commenting purposes.
comment_author_url_{HASH} Remembers the value entered into the comment form‘s URL field. Specific to the site from which it is set. This cookie mirrors one set by the core WordPress software for commenting purposes
  • Jetpack General Analytics
Cookie Name Duration Purpose
tk_ai session Stores a randomly-generated anonymous ID. This is only used within the admin area and is used for general analytics tracking.
  • Cookies & Consents Banner Widget
Cookie Name Duration Purpose
personalized-ads-consent Time is configured by site owner. Default time is 180 days. Remembers the state of visitor acceptance to personalized (cookie-based) advertising. This cookie is only set on sites running Jetpack Ads.
eucookielaw Time is configured by site owner. Default time is 180 days. Remembers the state of visitor acceptance to the use of cookies.
jp-visit-counter Time is configured by site owner. Default time is 180 days. Increments each time a visitor frequents a page containing this block – only used to control the block visibility.

Google Analytics

Google Analytics uses cookies to measure user-interactions on websites (Read more).

Google Analytics is a simple, easy-to-use tool that helps website owners measure how users interact with website content. As a user navigates between web pages, Google Analytics provides website owners JavaScript tags (libraries) to record information about the page a user has seen, for example the URL of the page. The Google Analytics JavaScript libraries use HTTP Cookies to “remember” what a user has done on previous pages / interactions with the website.

Google Analytics supports three JavaScript libraries (tags) for measuring website usage: gtag.js, analytics.js, and ga.js. The following sections describe how each use cookies.

gtag.js and analytics.js – cookie usage

The analytics.js JavaScript library is part of Universal Analytics and uses first-party cookies to:

  • Distinguish unique users
  • Throttle the request rate

When using the recommended JavaScript snippet, cookies are set at the highest possible domain level. For example, if your website address is blog.example.co.uk, analytics.js will set the cookie domain to .example.co.uk. Setting cookies on the highest level domain possible allows measurement to occur across subdomains without any extra configuration.

gtag.js and analytics.js set the following cookies:

Cookie Name Expiration Time Description
_ga 2 years Used to distinguish users.
_gid 24 hours Used to distinguish users.
_gat 1 minute Used to throttle request rate. If Google Analytics is deployed via Google Tag Manager, this cookie will be named _dc_gtm_<property-id>.
AMP_TOKEN 30 seconds to 1 year Contains a token that can be used to retrieve a Client ID from AMP Client ID service. Other possible values indicate opt-out, inflight request or an error retrieving a Client ID from AMP Client ID service.
_gac_<property-id> 90 days Contains campaign related information for the user. If you have linked your Google Analytics and Google Ads accounts, Google Ads website conversion tags will read this cookie unless you opt-out. Learn more.

Customization

Read the gtag.js Domains & Cookies developer guide to learn all the ways these default settings can be customized with gtag.js.

Read the analytics.js Domains & Cookies developer guide to learn all the ways these default settings can be customized with analytics.js.

Read the Security and privacy in Universal Analytics document for more information about Universal Analytics and cookies.

ga.js – cookie usage

The ga.js JavaScript library uses first-party cookies to:

  • Determine which domain to measure
  • Distinguish unique users
  • Throttle the request rate
  • Remember the number and time of previous visits
  • Remember traffic source information
  • Determine the start and end of a session
  • Remember the value of visitor-level custom variables

By default, this library sets cookies on the domain specified in the document.host browser property and sets the cookie path to the root level (/).

This library sets the following cookies:

Cookie Name Default Expiration Time Description
__utma 2 years from set/update Used to distinguish users and sessions. The cookie is created when the javascript library executes and no existing __utma cookies exists. The cookie is updated every time data is sent to Google Analytics.
__utmt 10 minutes Used to throttle request rate.
__utmb 30 mins from set/update Used to determine new sessions/visits. The cookie is created when the javascript library executes and no existing __utmb cookies exists. The cookie is updated every time data is sent to Google Analytics.
__utmc End of browser session Not used in ga.js. Set for interoperability with urchin.js. Historically, this cookie operated in conjunction with the __utmb cookie to determine whether the user was in a new session/visit.
__utmz 6 months from set/update Stores the traffic source or campaign that explains how the user reached your site. The cookie is created when the javascript library executes and is updated every time data is sent to Google Analytics.
__utmv 2 years from set/update Used to store visitor-level custom variable data. This cookie is created when a developer uses the _setCustomVar method with a visitor level custom variable. This cookie was also used for the deprecated _setVar method. The cookie is updated every time data is sent to Google Analytics.

Customization

The following methods can be used to customize how cookies are set:

GOOGLE ADSENSE