Production Process Reports & Studies

Improving Mechanical Properties of Cementitious Composites Containing Incinerated Sugarcane Filter Cake (FREE)

Bio-strengthening of cementitious composites from incinerated sugarcane filter cake by a calcifying bacterium Lysinibacillus sp. WH

This study investigated Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) technology to improve the mechanical properties of cementitious composites containing incinerated sugarcane filter cake (IFC) using a calcifying bacterium Lysinibacillus sp. WH.

Both IFC obtained after the first and second clarification processes, referred to as white (IWFC) and black (IBFC), were experimented.

This is the first work to investigate the use of IBFC as a cement replacement.

According to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) results, the main element of IWFC and IBFC was CaO (91.52%) and SiO2 (58.80%), respectively.

This is also the first work to investigate the use of IBFC as a cement replacement.

We found that the addition of strain WH could further enhance the strength of both cementitious composites up to ~ 31%, while reduced water absorption and void.

Microstructures of the composites were visualized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

The cement hydration products were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) followed by Rietveld analysis.

The results indicated that biogenic CaCO3 was the main composition in enhancing strength of the IBFC composite, whereas induce tricalcium silicate (C3S) formation promoting the strength of IWFC composite.

This work provided strong evidence that the mechanical properties of the cementitious composites could be significantly improved through the application of MICP.

In fact, the strength of IFC-based cementitious composites after boosting by strain WH is only 10% smaller than that of the conventional Portland cement.

While using IFC as a cement substitute is a greener way to produce environmentally friendly materials, it also provides a solution to long-term agro-industrial waste pollution problems.

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Bio-strengthening of cementitious composites from incinerated sugarcane filter cake by a calcifying bacterium Lysinibacillus sp. WH


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